Rancho Gordo Heirloom Beans

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Rancho Gordo Heirloom Beans

10.00

Rancho Gordo heirloom beans (and Posole) now available! (1 lb. bags)

If you are unfamiliar with heirloom beans from Rancho Gordo, visit their web site for more information. In a nut shell, grocery store beans have often been on the shelf for up to 5 years. These heirloom beans are fresh and in limited quantities each year. You can truly taste the difference! And they make a simple meal, any day of the week.

Ayocote Morado - Rancho Gordo refers to this variety as a "gateway bean." The Ayocote Morado's big, beefy texture is perfect for those trying to cut out meat and eat a more plant-based diet, or for vegetarians who are cooking dinner for their omnivore friends. No one will miss the meat when you toss them with good fruity olive oil, sauteed wild mushrooms and a little too much garlic. Equally great as a side dish for a classic steak! Along with the beans, Ayocote Morados provide a deep, bouillon-flavored bean broth, making them ideal for soups. Originally from Oaxaca, Mexico, the Ayocote family was one of the first cultivated crops of the New World. They are grown all over central and northern Mexico. Suggestions: Pot beans, soups, chili, casseroles

Alubia Blanca - When fully cooked, it's somewhat starchy and has a mild potato flavor, which screams for bacon or pancetta. Keep cooking and they go from dense to creamy and even a little buttery. You can make an elaborate dish like a cassoulet or you can just drizzle your best olive oil on the top and enjoy them with no fuss.  

White Corn Posole - After a gentle simmer, dried hominy opens up like a delicious flower and is ready to use in soups, stews and the classic southwestern and Mexican dish, Pozole (or Posole). The corn is prepared by removing the skins after soaking them in the mineral lime (cal), which changes the flavor (for the better) and releases the niacin, making this slightly processed grain healthier than simple dried corn or cornmeal. The real fun is cooking posole. After soaking, you simmer it for a few hours with an onion and before long, your whole kitchen smells like a glorious, delicious wet tortilla.

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